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Womens Health

Dr Rebecca Deans

MBBS, MM (RH&HG), FRANZCOG, CREIMBBS, MM (RH&HG), FRANZCOG, CREI

Dr Rebecca Deans is a Gynaecologist with a special interest in
paediatric and adolescent gynaecology, and fertility. She works at the Royal Hospital for Women, Sydney Children’s Hospital, Prince of Wales Private Hospital, and Genea. She is a lecturer at the University of New South Wales where she is involved in ongoing medical research and teaching of medical students.

Specialties

  • General infertility
  • Miscarriage management
  • PCOS
  • Premature ovarian failure

Experience and Qualifications

Rebecca completed her medical degree at Sydney University. She is a Fellow of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG). Her speciality training was in Obstetrics and Gynaecology which she completed in 2008. She subsequently developed an interest in the subspecialty area of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (CREI), and Paediatric and Adolescent Gynaecology, which she completed in 2011. As part of her training, Rebecca travelled to London to work at University College London Hospital. She also travelled to France (Paris and Lyon) to further her skills in assisted conception, reproductive surgery, and paediatric and adolescent gynaecology. Rebecca holds a Master’s of Human Reproduction and Human Genetics from Sydney University and also has a PhD from UNSW. The subject of her thesis was Asherman Syndrome.

Paediatric and adolescent gynaecology

Rebecca is the only appointed specialist in Paediatric and Adolescent Gynaecology at Sydney Children’s Hospital and the Royal Hospital for Women. As well as seeing patients in her private rooms, Dr Deans also has clinics at the RHW and SCH for paediatrics, adolescents and young adults. She sees patients from birth, for concerns including but not limited to early and late puberty, congenital anomalies, menstrual pain, heavy menstrual bleeding, and contraceptive advice.

Fertility

Rebecca sees couples with a variety of fertility problems and provides a range of treatments. There are many options available to couples including:

  • Surgical procedures to assist fertility, including laparoscopy for endometriosis
  • Ovulation Induction
  • Intrauterine Insemination
  • IVF
  • Egg and Sperm Freezing
  • Egg and Sperm donation

Some of the more complex fertility management issues Dr Deans takes interest in are: fertility preservation following cancer diagnosis; recurrent miscarriage; and premature ovarian insufficiency.

As a CREI certified fertility specialist, Dr Deans works closely with the team at Genea, in addition to her practice at the fertility clinic that runs within the Royal Hospital for Women.

It is incredibly satisfying when couples achieve their goal of bringing a healthy baby into the world and I enjoy experiencing the journey with you.’

Uterine transplant project

Rebecca is the lead researcher of a collaborative uterine transplant project. The project has ethics approval for 6 live and 6 deceased transplants.  The aim of the project is to give women born without a uterus, or who have lost their uterus due to cancer, the opportunity for pregnancy and to fulfil their dream of achieving motherhood.

general gynaecology

General Gynaecology

Common gynaecological procedures performed by Dr Deans:

  • Removal and Insertion of IUD Hysteroscopy and biopsy
  • Endometrial ablation
  • Vaginal septum resection
  • Laparoscopic surgery
  • Tubal Patency testing
  • Fibroid resection
  • Uterine septum resection
  • Removal of Ectopic Pregnancy
  • Division of intrauterine adhesions for Asherman Syndrome
  • Vaginoplasty using skin, bowel and buccal grafts.
  • She is the only surgeon in Australia performing buccal vaginoplasty  surgery

FAQs

What is the pathophysiology of cervical cancer?

Cervical cancer is caused by changes to the cells in the cervix that most often occur as a result of human papilloma virus (HPV). This virus causes changes to the cells of the cervix that lead to pre cancerous lesions (CIN I, II, and III). If these pre cancerous cells are left unmonitored or untreated they have the propensity to progress to cervcial cancer.

Will I need chemotherapy to treat cervical cancer?

The treatment of cervical cancer in usually a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy depending on the stage of cancer, and the age of the patient.

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